Question:

I recently came accross Stem Cell Shampoo! How could stem cells really be in a shampoo?? Billed as THINNING HAIR TREATMENT  and very expensive! Is there any true shampoo that will treat my scalp for thinning hair?

Thank you for your time, I do appreciate it much

Answer:

some patients report Nizoral shampoo as helping them. It contains an anti-fungal low dose medication that might help if the hair thinning is due to a low-grade fungal infection. Some claim that medication in Nizoral will block DHT which can cause hair loss in genetically sensitive patients Otherwise, there are no live stem cells that would survive in a shampoo. Along with that claim, you should be aware that the stem cells cannot be absorbed though the skin or into the hair follicle to get an effect

Question:

Would any of these ingrediants: Niacinamide Vitamin B3 5%, Matrixyl 3000, Argireline & Ferulic Acid, aid in growing eyelashes? Thank you for your advice.

Answer:

I  think the combination of products should help to some degree, that will depend on the amount of each that is in the mixture, but I think it is worth a try.

Question:

RevitaLash is now the exact same forumulation as Latisse, right?

Answer:

No, it is not the same exact compound. Revitalash does have a proprietary compound which is similar but if it was the same you would need a prescription for it, just like Latisse.

Question:

Dr. Garcia, we are incredibly grateful to you for the information about hair growth following shedding. Thank you! You are an amazing resource! NOWHERE else have we found that information. All one can discover on alopecia websites is the vague reassurance that in cases of telogen effluvium, "the new hair is pushing out the shedding hair, so hair loss is really a sign of hair growth."  That may be theoretically true, but it's cheap and not fully accurate consolation.  So...I had the surgery on May 28, and my hair started to shed on June 5 (which seemed extremely early to me, but that's when it started); the shedding really picked up in pace by June 20. Would you please tell me if my calculations sound correct? According to the information you so kindly provided, the telogen phase lasts three months from the initial shock, so that would mean my hair can continue to shed until September 5  (three months from June 5) and won't start to regrow until then. Is that right? And then, once those three months have passed, how long before I should start to see new hair breaking through the scalp? Immediately?  A month? More? And the new hair once is breaks through the scalp, it should grow about .5 inches/month, yes?  I must be driving you crazy, but you generously told me that many questions are fine. Good heavens, I hope you're own patients aren't as high maintenance as I am!  :-) Thank you so much, Dr. Garcia. My sweet husband and I are actually about 90% calmer now that we've found you!

Answer:

OK, let me see if I can clarify it for you. You are correct, but the shock affects hair follicles that were in the growth phase. Those lying dormant are not as affected. What does that mean? It means that although you might shed until September there will likely be the start of growth sooner as those hairs that were sleeping, some of them were preparing to wake up sooner than others so it comes in waves. That is why normally when you go to get your hair cut the strands are all different lengths as they started growing at different times. I will also say that I have seen hair loss from the anesthesia starting the very next day. So I am hopeful that you might not be as affected as we thought since it took a few days. I think you will likely see some small hair peeking out in the next few weeks. They will look like baby hair at the begining and then will thicken as the keratin gets stronger.The rate of growth that you mentioned is about right, it varies during the year with faster growth in warm weather and slower in cold. I am happy to help. I learn so much from these questions and you are just like the rest of my physical patients, not to worry. Always here if you have more ?'s.

Question:

Hi, Dr. Garcia. I wrote a few weeks ago about hair loss after a facelift. It continues at a depressing speed. It's too hot for wigs where I live in this season, so I am wearing scarves -- and shame on me, people are assuming I am undergoing some kind of drastic medical treatment, which I'm having to correct by saying it's just a medication I'm on. I saw my surgeon on Friday and he was genuinely shocked by my appearance. He said he'd seen a few hairs come out on other patients along an incision that may have gone into a hairline but never anything like this before. He agreed that I looked like a chemotherapy patient. I think to reassure himself as much as me, he said, "Well, the good news is that every single hair you lose is being replaced. The old hair is being pushed out of your scalp because new hair is growing in. It's not just falling out for no reason. You can't see it yet, but every last one of those hairs is coming back.." I don't know. I imagine that some of it may come back in the 4-6 months you predict, but I think some of this is just falling out never to be replace because 85-90% of my hair could not be in the resting/shedding phase at the same time. Is he right or am I? I would prefer knowing the truth so I can be emotionally prepared. This is a really depressing. Major alopecia should be listed as a significant, expected side effect of facelifts on the consent forms and in the consultation. I don't think I would have proceeded had I known. Thank you for your kind help.

Answer:

you are correct, not 85-90% of your hair is in the resting phase. Some was in it and then the stress of the surgery put many others into the same resting phase due to the stress.So temporarily you might have a high percentage in the phase that is not growing I know it looks bad but use the Rogaine as I mentioned and give it some time. I have never seen it not come back in over 27 years of doing this.

Question:

I had a facelift two months ago (no incisions in the hairline, no general anesthesia, just local), and my hair is falling out so aggressively (I count about 1200 hairs in the bathtub after every shower and far too many to count on the bathroom floor every morning) that I'm shopping for a wig. I'm really, really upset. I've read back issues of your blog and see that you tell people that hair loss following facial surgery is likely a cortisone response to the metabolic insult of surgery (have I got that right?) and that if the hair is falling out, that means that new hairs are coming up beneath them (and I have got that right too?). That's very encouraging advice, but I don't see any new hairs coming through my own scalp yet, just ever-growing bald patches. Do you think my hair will grow back, Dr. Garcia? If so, when should I see those new hairs coming in? Thank you for your kind help.

Answer:

yes, that is the case, it is from the stress of the surgery. The hair normally does come back, but if you desire you can use Rogaine spray to speed the process up. Hair grows in slow cycles and not all the hair is at the same cycle so the growth appears very erratic. It can take 3--4 months after the surgery and the stress for the hair follicles that went dormant to start to grow again.

Question:

Hi Dr. G,
My uncle is 65 and has a full head of hair but with temporal recession - a mature hairline essentially.
My father is 60 but has lost most of the hair on top. He basically has to do a comb-over. The hair-loss pattern he has is very irregularly shaped up top.
My uncle lives a much more relaxed life and has been retired for many years.
My father is a doctor and leads a very stressful life and is also diabetic. His hair loss began at 55, according to him. Looking at his younger pictures, his hairline began to recede throughout his 30s and 40s. I remember him having a full head of hair until his 50s.
My hairline is similar to his but lower and thicker than his was at 30. He had a family at 30 though, and I'm in graduate school without kids or any of the stressors he had to deal with.
Anyways - is it possible that his hair-loss was due to diabetes? I know that genetics account for 80% of hair loss. Day-to-day environmental factors do not really cause permanent hair-loss.

Answer:

I have not seen diabetes cause hair loss. It is genetics but it s inherited from the maternal side of the family, not the paternal side, so look at your Mom's relatives and not your Dad's. Day to day environmental damage will not cause it either.

Question:

It sounds like Scalp Med and a surgical procedure is the complete formula to get frontal hair restoration and regrowth all around;  Is this correct ?
 
How is the sequence of steps I must take?
Where does Dr Garcia consult?

Answer:

I think the hair grafting is the first step and then any hair products after that if needed. I see patients for consultation at our office
6020 S. Rainbow Blvd, Las Vegas Nevada, 89118
phone is (702) 870-0058